Citizen Cope & Alice Smith

Citizen Cope
Born Clarence Greenwood, a child of the seventies, Citizen Cope's life journey is as singular as his art. He is the radically mashed-up product of Greenville, Mississippi; Memphis, Tennessee; Vernon, Texas; Austin, Texas; Washington, DC; and Brooklyn, New York. These locations are felt everywhere in his stories. His sounds are southern rural, big sky lonely, concrete urban, and painfully romantic.

In the past nine years, he has produced five albums of depth and distinction (Citizen Cope, The Clarence Greenwood Recordings, Every Waking Moment, The Rainwater LP, One Lovely Day), each a critical chapter in his search for a sound that paints an auditory American landscape in which despair wars with hope and hope, tied to love, is elusive.

citizencope.com

 

Alice Smith

The NYC-born singer/songwriter/producer, known for her 4-octave vocal range and stunning stage presence, made a name for herself with her critically-acclaimed 2006 debut album, For Lovers, Dreamers & Me, with a Grammy nomination for the single "Dream". For a young performer who had until recently cut her teeth within the New York Afro-Punk scene—where she sang with Black Rock Coalition and Tamar Kali, and collaborated with Zero 7's Sia Furler and Imani Coppola—the spotlight attention was a surprise. She signed to Epic Records after a bidding war and re-released For Lovers in 2007. The next four years were dedicated to writing and recording new material. With notes of '60s pop, Burt Bacharach-style melodies and that intoxicating element of attitude, Alice's upcoming collection has something for die-hard followers and new fans alike. Her sound has evolved, adding lush, orchestral arrangements and multi-hued melodies. Though she has always been an artist at heart, Alice is now a mother, and she's been through some powerful experiences over the past few years. She emerges with new insights to realize through song. Still singing, of course, but today, stepping out independently, she has all the more reason to give 'em something they can feel.

alicesmith.com